Design and Technology

Design Technology Curriculum

DT- Intent, Implementation, Impact

Intent

At our school we want Design and Technology to prepare our children to deal with tomorrow’s rapidly changing world. We want to ensure that it encourages children to become independent, creative problem solvers and thinkers as individuals and part of a team. We want our pupils to be able to identify needs and opportunities and to respond to them by developing a range of ideas and by making products and systems. Through the study of Design and Technology, they will combine practical skills with an understanding of aesthetic, social and environmental issues, as well as functions and industry. This will allow them to reflect on and evaluate past and present technology, it’s uses and impacts. Design and Technology also embeds our school learning behaviours. It is an inspiring, rigorous and practical subject, requiring creativity, resourcefulness, and imagination. Pupils design and make products that solve real and relevant problems within a variety of contexts. It is very cross – curricular and draws upon subject knowledge and skills within Mathematics, Science, History, Computing and Art. Children learn to take risks, be reflective, innovative, enterprising and resilient. Through the evaluation of past and present technology they can reflect upon the impact of Design Technology on everyday life and the wider world

Implementation

Key skills and key knowledge for D and T have been mapped across the school to ensure progression between year groups. The context for the children’s work in Design and Technology is also well considered and children learn about real life structures and the purpose of specific examples, as well as developing their skills throughout the programme of study. Design and technology lessons are also mainly taught as a block so that children’s learning is focused throughout each unit of work. We have created a comprehensive progression document for staff to follow to best embed and cover every element of the Design Technology curriculum. The knowledge/skills statements build year on year to deepen and challenge our learners.

 

Key objectives of intent within the Design Technology Curriculum based on the National Curriculum 2014 guidance:

  • Products are to be made for a purpose.
  • Individuality should be ensured in children’s design and construction of products.
  • Delivery of the two strands: Designing and Making and Cooking and Nutrition.
  • More emphasis to be given on creating ‘innovative’ products in KS2.
  • Teaching the importance of making on-going changes and improvements during making stages.
  • Looking into seasonality of ingredients and how they are grown, caught or reared.
  • The introduction of computing and coding of products in KS2.
  • Researching key events and individual designers in the History of Technology in KS2.

 

Aims

The national curriculum for Design and Technology aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • develop the creative, technical and practical expertise need to perform everyday tasks confidently and to participate successfully in an increasingly technological world.
  • build and apply a repertoire of knowledge, understanding and skills in order to design and make high-quality prototypes and products for a wide range of users
  • critique, evaluate and test their ideas and products and the work of others
  • understand and apply the principles of nutrition and learn how to cook.

 

How to Implement the progression document and long-term plan

It is the intent at Jennetts Park C of E Primary School for Design Technology to be taught in all year groups through at least one topic per term, which includes topics relating to food. Design Technology projects are often made cross curricular – linking to other subjects taught.  The teaching of Design Technology across the school follows the National Curriculum. Children design products with a purpose in mind and an intended user of the products. Food technology is implemented across the school with children developing an understanding of where food comes from, the importance of a varied and healthy diet and how to prepare this. Design and technology is a crucial part of school life and learning and it is for this reason that as a school we are dedicated to the teaching and delivery of a high quality Design and Technology curriculum; through well planned and resourced projects and experiences.

When designing and making, the children are taught to:

Design:
• use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups
• generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design
Make:
• select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks (for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing) accurately
• select from and use a wider range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities
Evaluate:
• investigate and analyse a range of existing products
• evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work
• understand how key events and individuals in design and technology have helped shape the world
Technical knowledge:
• apply their understanding of how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce more complex structures
• understand and use mechanical systems in their products
• understand and use electrical systems in their products
• apply their understanding of computing to program, monitor and control their products

 

Impact

We ensure the children;
• develop the creative, technical and practical expertise needed to perform everyday tasks confidently and to participate successfully in an increasingly technological world
• build and apply a repertoire of knowledge, understanding and skills in order to design and make high-quality prototypes and products for a wide range of users and critique, evaluate and test their ideas and products and the work of others
• understand and apply the principles of nutrition and learn how to cook. Children will design and make a range of products. A good quality finish will be expected in all design and activities made appropriate to the age and ability of the child

Children learn how to take risks, becoming resourceful, innovative, enterprising and capable citizens. Through the evaluation of past and present design and technology, they develop a critical understanding of its impact on daily life and the wider world. High-quality design and technology education makes an             essential contribution to the creativity, culture, wealth and well-being of the nation.

 

Progression in EYFS

  Design Make Evaluate Technical Knowledge Food and Nutrition
EYFS  

Begin to use the language of designing and making, e.g. join, build and shape.

-Learning about planning and adapting initial ideas to make them better.

To learn to construct with a purpose in mind. -Selects tools and techniques needed to shape, assemble and join materials. Begin to talk about changes made during the making process, e.g. making a decision to use a different joining method. To learn how to use a range of tools, e.g. scissors, hole punch, stapler, woodworking tools, rolling pins, pastry cutters. -Learn how everyday objects work by dismantling things.  

To begin to understand some of the tools, techniques and processes involved in food preparation.

-Children have basic hygiene awareness.

 

DT Progression Map KS1/KS2

Designing Key Stage 1 Key Stage 2
Understanding contexts, users and purpose

Across KS1 pupils should:

·        Work confidently within a range of contexts, such as imaginary, story based, home, school, gardens, playgrounds, local community, industry and the wider environment

·        State what products they are designing and making

·        Say whether their products are for themselves or other users

·        Describe what their products are for

·        Say how their products will work

·        Say how they will make their products suitable for their intended users

·        Use simple design criteria to help develop their ideas

Across KS2 pupils should:

·        Work confidently within a range of contexts, such as the home, school, leisure, culture, enterprise, industry and the wider environment

·        Describe the purpose of their products

·        Indicate the design features of their products that will appeal to intended users

·        Explain how particular parts of their products work

 

In early KS2 pupils should also:

·        Gather information about the needs and wants of particular individuals and groups

·        Develop their own design criteria and use these to inform their ideas

 

 

In Late KS2 pupils should also:

·        Carry out research, using surveys, interviews, questionnaires and web-based resources

·        Identify the needs, wants, preferences and values of particular individuals and groups

·        Develop a simple design specification to guide their thinking

Generating, developing, modelling and communicating ideas

Across KS1 pupils should:

·        Generate ideas by drawing on their own experiences

·        Use knowledge of existing products to help come up with ideas

·        Develop and communicate ideas by talking and drawing

·        Model ideas by exploring materials, components and construction kits and by making templates and mock-ups

·        Use information and communication technology, where appropriate, to develop and communicate their ideas

Across KS2 pupils should:

·        Share and clarify ideas through discussion

·        Model their ideas using prototypes and pattern pieces

·        Use annotated sketches, cross-sectional drawings and exploded diagrams to develop and communicate their ideas

·        Use computer-aided design to develop and communicate this ideas

 

In early KS2 pupils should also:

·        Generate realistic ideas, focusing on the needs of the user

·        Make design decisions that take account of the availability of resources

 

In Late KS2 pupils should also:

·        Generate innovative ideas, drawing on research

·        Make design decisions, taking account of constraints such as time, resources and cost

 

 

Making Key Stage 1 Key Stage 2
Planning

Across KS1 pupils should:

·        Plan  by suggesting what to do next

·        Select from a range of tools and equipment, explaining their choices

·        Select from a range of materials and components according to their characteristics

Across KS2 pupils should:

·        Select tools and equipment suitable for the task

·        Explain their choice of tools and equipment in relation to the skills and techniques they will be using

·        Select materials and components suitable for the task

·        Explain their choice of materials and components according to functional properties and aesthetic qualities

 

In early KS2 pupils should also:

·        Order the main stages of making

 

In Late KS2 pupils should also:

·        Produce appropriate lists of tools, equipment and materials that they need

·        Formulate step-by-step plans as a guide to making

Practical skills and techniques

Across KS1 pupils should:

·        Follow procedures for safety and hygiene

·        Use a range of materials and components, including construction materials and kits, textiles, food ingredients and mechanical components

·        Assemble, join and combine materials and components

·        Use finishing techniques, including those from art and design

Across KS2 pupils should:

·        Follow procedures for safety and hygiene

·        Use a wider range of materials and components than KS1, including construction materials and kits, textiles, food ingredients, mechanical components and electrical components

 

In early KS2 pupils should also:

·        Measure, mark out, cut and shape materials and components with some accuracy

·        Assemble, join and combine materials and components with some accuracy

·        Apply a range of finishing techniques, including those from art and design, with some accuracy

In Late KS2 pupils should also:

·        Accurately measure, mark out, cut and shape materials and components

·        Accurately assemble, join and combine materials and components

·        Accurately apply a range of finishing techniques, including those from art and design

·        Use techniques that involve a number of steps

·        Demonstrate resourcefulness when tackling practical problems

 

Evaluating Key Stage 1 Key Stage 2
Own ideas and products

Across KS1 pupils should:

·        Talk about their design ideas and what they are making

·        Make simple judgements about their products and ideas against design criteria

·        Suggest how their products could be improved

Across KS2 pupils should:

·        Identify the strengths and areas for development in their ideas and products

·        Consider the views of others, including intended users, to improve their work

 

In early KS2 pupils should also:

·        Refer to their design criteria as they design and make

·        Use their design criteria to evaluate their completed products

 

In Late KS2 pupils should also:

·        Critically evaluate the quality of the design, manufacture and fitness for purpose of their products as they design and make

·        Evaluate their ideas and products against their original design specification

Existing products

Across KS1 pupils should:

·        What products are

·        Who products are for

·        What products are for

·        How products work

·        How products are used

·        Where products might be used

·        What materials products are made from

·        What they like and dislike about products

Across KS2 pupils should:

·        How well products have been designed

·        How well products have been made

·        Why materials have been chosen

·        What methods of construction have been used

·        How well products work

·        How well products achieve their purposes

·        How well products meet user needs and wants

 

In early KS2 pupils should also:

·        Who designed and made the products

·        Where products were designed and made

·        When products were designed and made

·        Whether products can be recycled or reused

 

In Late KS2 pupils should also:

·        How much products cost to make

·        How innovative products are

·        How sustainable the materials in products are

·        What impact products have beyond their intended purpose

 

Technical Knowledge Key Stage 1 Key Stage 2
Making products work

Across KS1 pupils should know:

·        About the simple working characteristics of materials and components

·        About the movement of simple mechanisms such as levers, sliders, wheels and axles

·        How freestanding structures can be made stronger, stiffer and more stable

·        That a 3d textiles product can be assembled from two identical fabric shapes

·        That food ingredients should be combined according to their sensory characteristics

·        The correct technical vocabulary for the projects they are undertaking

Across KS2 pupils should know:

·        How to use learning from science to help design and make products that work

·        How to use learning from mathematics to help design and make products that work

·        That materials have both functional properties and aesthetic qualities

·        That materials can be combined and mixed to create more useful characteristics

·        That mechanical and electrical systems have an input, process and output

·        The correct technical vocabulary for the projects they are undertaking

 

In early KS2 pupils should also know:

·        How mechanical systems such as levers and linkages or pneumatic systems create movement

·        How simple electrical circuits and components can be used to create functional products

·        How to program a computer to control their products

·        How to make strong, stiff shell structures

·        That a single fabric shape can be used to make a 3d textiles product

·        That food ingredients can be fresh, pre-cooked and processed

·

In Late KS2 pupils should also know:

·        How mechanical systems such as cams or pulleys or gears create movement

·        How more complex electrical circuits and components can be used to create functional products

·        How to program a computer to monitor changes in the environment and control their products

·        How to reinforce and strengthen a 3d framework

·        That a 3d testiltes product can be made from a combination of fabric shapes

·        That a recipe can be adapted by adding or substituting one or more ingredients

 

 

Cooking and nutrition Key Stage 1 Key Stage 2
Where food comes from

Across KS1 pupils should know:

·        That all food comes from plants or animals

·        That food has to be farmed, grown elsewhere (e.g. home) or caught

Across KS2 pupils should:

·        That food is grown (such as tomatoes, wheat etc), reared (such as chickens and cattle) and caught (such as fish) in the UK, Europe and the world

 

In Late KS2 pupils should also:

·        That seasons may affect the food available

·        How food is processed into ingredients that can be eaten or used in cooking

·

Food preparation, cooking and nutrition

Across KS1 pupils should know:

·        How to name and sort foods into the five groups in The Eatwell Plate

·        That everyone should eat at least five portions of fruit and vegetables every day

·        How to prepare simple dishes safely and hygienically, without using a heat source

·        How to use techniques such as cutting, peeling and grating

 

Across KS2 pupils should:

·        How to prepare and cook a variety of predominatntly savoury dishes safely and hygienically including, where appropriate, the use of a heat source

·        How to use a range of techniques such as peeling, chopping, slicing, grating, mixing, spreading, kneading and baking

 

In early KS2 pupils should also:

·        That a healthy diet is made up from a variety and balance of different food and drink (The Eatwell Plate)

·        That to be active and healthy, food and drink are needed to provide energy for the body

 

In Late KS2 pupils should also:

·        That recipes can be adapted to change the appearance, taste, texture and aroma

·        That different food and drink contain different substances-nutrients, water and fibre – that are needed for health